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  1. #1

    Long term storage of Baking soda, powder and yeast

    I am mylar bagging some yeast, baking soda and powder.
    It seems that i have heard that you shouldn't use 02 obsorbers in these products.

    Does anyone know for sure?

    Thanks,
    ree

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    The only thing that I have heard is that you should store your yeast in the freezer. It will last 5 years that way. I keep ours in the freezer.

    Dave

  3. #3
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    I keep flour in my freezer as well, as it keeps it free of bugs, I found that you have to bring things back to room temps, before making bread , for the yeast to work properly.

  4. #4
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    Freezer storage for yeast, as the others mentioned - oxygen-free storage is always best. FoodSaver or oxygen absorbers - not sure how many oa - I use a FoodSaver. This list may be helpful: https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/e...ed_amounts.htm

    Baking soda and baking powder have an indefinite (or nearly so) shelf-life, but they may lose their effectiveness and potency over time. You will want to test all of these ingredients when you open them for use after being in storage to make sure they are working.

    Yeast Test:
    In a 1-cup glass measuring cup, fill it to the 1/4 c. line with warm water. Add 1-1/2 t. yeast, 1 t. sugar. Wait 10-minutes. The mixture should be up to the 1/2 c. line. If the proofing liquid won't double in bulk, it won't raise dough to the standard "double".

    Baking Powder: mix 1 teaspoon (5 grams) baking powder with 1/2 cup (120 ml) hot water and the mixture should bubble immediately

    Baking Soda: mix 1/4 teaspoon baking soda with 2 teaspoons of vinegar and the mixture should bubble immediately.

    I'd also suggest learning how to make, use and maintain a (sourdough) starter as a major source for leavening so you can reduce the use of baking soda, baking powder and baker's yeast. You can make nearly everything with a starter that you can with chemical leavening. All it takes to make a starter is water and flour.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grainlady View Post
    Baking soda and baking powder have an indefinite (or nearly so) shelf-life, but they may lose their effectiveness and potency over time. You will want to test all of these ingredients when you open them for use after being in storage to make sure they are working.
    My understanding of this is that baking soda does have an indefinite shelf life and potency, but with baking powder the soda has already started reacting (minutely) with the cream of tartar which causes it to lose potency over time. However, cream of tartar also has an indefinite shelf life. So I store baking soda and cream of tartar separately and then they can be combined 2:1 tartar to soda to make baking powder (baking powder will also sometimes have 1 part corn starch as well, but that isn't necessary for the rising action -- it does help longevity on the shelf as it absorbs moisture which would react with the soda and tartar).
    Last edited by Bazooka Joe; 08-01-2011 at 08:23 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazooka Joe View Post
    My understanding of this is that baking soda does have an indefinite shelf life and potency, but with baking powder the soda has already started reacting (minutely) with the cream of tartar which causes it to lose potency over time. However, cream of tartar also has an indefinite shelf life. So I store baking soda and cream of tartar separately and then they can be combined 2:1 tartar to soda to make baking powder (baking powder will also sometimes have 1 part corn starch as well, but that isn't necessary for the rising action -- it does help longevity on the shelf as it absorbs moisture which would react with the soda and tartar).
    Good info thank you so much
    Robert W
    "The Democracy Will Cease To Exist When You Take Away From Those Who Are Willing To Work And Give to Those Who Are Not." -Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    Great info grainlady and bazooka joe. Thanks

  8. #8
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    Excellent!! This is what makes forums like this so valuable. Thanks.
    Ender

    "The only question is when peak oil will happen. The Chinese are preparing for a global production peak in 2012.
    Without contingency planning and preparation at least 10 years in advance, the U.S. will have a really bumpy ride. Oil runs our economy. Oil runs our military. Oil makes and transports the food that we eat."
    Roscoe Bartlett

  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    I think your answer for your long term storage of yeast pre-SHTF is a freezer. Post SHTF it's sourdough.

    http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/233
    Crusis
    Colorado Springs, Colorado

    www.homeprepping.com

  10. #10
    Junior Member
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    Here is a little more info on yeast.
    Yeast, a living organism, has a relatively short storage life. Keep yeast in the original metal foil storage containers. If the seal remains intact, yeast should last 2 years at 70 degrees F. However it is strongly recommended that you refrigerate it, which should give you a storage life of 5 years. Frozen yeast should store for a long time.

 

 

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